Tag Archives: techniques

We are Giving Away a Fine Art Print

We are giving away a print of this photograph!!  Would you like to have it?  The links to the rules and entry form are below the photograph.

This is a low resolution copy of the photograph that is being given away.  The actual print that is being given away is printed on metalic photographic paper and mounted to a plastic board.  The logo in the lower right corner of this image will not be on the photograph that is awarded.

This is a low resolution copy of the photograph that is being given away. The actual print that is being given away is printed on metallic photographic paper, mounted to a plastic board and is 12 inches by 18 inches. The logo in the lower right corner of this image will not be on the photograph that is awarded.

The contest rules are here and the entry form is here.

NO PURCHASE IS NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN.  A PURCHASE WILL NOT INCREASE YOUR CHANCES OF WINNING.  ALL FEDERAL, STATE, LOCAL, AND MUNICIPAL LAWS AND REGULATIONS APPLY.  VOID WHERE PROHIBITED.

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How did I do that?

I have returned to the need to log the details of images as I capture them on film.  It seems that nobody is making a paper photo log anymore and I spent several hours looking for software either for my android phone or my iPod touch that met my requirements including not needing a data connection to record the data and the ability to export the data in a form that I could work with on my computers.  I did not have any luck finding one that someone else had created, it seems that nobody has found a need to track this information on a portable device.

The solution that I came up with and spent the morning implementing is using a database software called Memento by LuckyDroid for my android phone.  This is an ad-supported version and they have a “Pro” version for $9.99USD that is ad free and provides faster support.  I chose this software and route because it allowed me to create all of the fields that I wanted, in the order I wanted, does not require a data connection to store the information, and a free version to allow me to set it up and see if it meets my needs before spending money on something that my not do what I need.

Here is a list of the fields I currently have set up:

Roll: allows multiple rolls to be in one database
Frame: frame number on the roll
Date/Time
Shutter Speed
F stop
Lens
Filter
Distance: camera to subject distance
Notes: misc notes about settings, weather, anything that does not fit another field
Location: address is available, latitude and longitude thanks to GPS in my phone and google maps.

Thanks to the well written database software I will be able to revise this list as I find the need to.

Having these records of how the images were created is very important in the evaluation process of the resulting images.  It allows for the recreation of an effect from one image in the creation of new ones allowing for the creation of a series of images with a similar look and feel.

Aside

I have found a number of good articles on basic composition, here is a link to photography.com, Basic Composition for Photography | Basic Concepts | Photography.com, that is a good brief article with links to other sites and articles on … Continue reading

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Changes in photography in the past 35 years

My wife wants to take better photos.  This means someone needs determine what she already knows and fill in the gaps. To work with her, I have been trying to remember the first basics of photography that I learned 35 years ago.  I realized that there has been a lot of progress in camera technology in that time.  Cameras now determine the correct exposure, focus, and some can even correct minor composition issues.  Digital is the biggest change that has happened and that was during the time that I was away from photography.  The single largest advantage that is provides is the ability to immediately review a photo and decide if it is acceptable, no more waiting to process the film and make a print to see if the image is what you expected.  That is most of the basics that I learned years ago and leaves the composition as the main basic to teach someone. The rest of the old basics now seem to be considered advanced techniques.

During this contemplation, I remembered the first camera that I used and think I still have somewhere, an old Kodak Brownie Hawkeye.  This is an old roll film camera that took 620 film and 12 pictures on a roll.  It is actually a medium format camera with a negative size of 6cm x 6cm.  It is a really basic camera with no shutter speed control, no aperture, and no way to focus.  This makes it similar to modern digital cameras in the fact that all you have to worry about is composition.  It also means that the first thing I learned was composition and did not learn about focusing and correct exposure until I was given a 35mm camera.

I need to track down basic articles and guides on composition and go through them with my wife. I will post links to any decent articles that I find. The review will be good for me and also help her to become a better photographer.  So her camera will stay in automatic mode to deal with the major settings while she improves the composition of her images and her eye as a photographer.

We are going to join the Reno Photo Club at the meeting tonight, my family were members when I was learning the feedback from the competitions was helpful and the workshops were very good.

An interesting technique for creating very interesting photos

I was just reading an interesting article about High Dynamic Range Photography at The Art of HDR Photography Part 1: Guides: Learn: Digital Photography Review.  The author provides a very through walk through of the details of the technique and why it can be useful.  I have worked with some HDR images using my Canon A720IS with the CHDK that I referenced in an earlier post.

This image is one of my attempts with HDR images.  The difference from the original files is in the shadows within the building and the additional detail in the shadows and the sagebrush.

Fort Churchill HDR

I achieved an interesting image by combining some night shots in downtown Reno.  The visible clouds and the bottom of the river are enhanced by the combining of the images.

Wingfield Park HDR-2

These and several other HDR images that I created are at my office live photos, here are thumbnails of them.

I plan on doing more of these images after I get the new camera next month.